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General Introduction of the Replica Grand Seiko Spring Drive

As Seiko-watchers will notice that the Grand Seiko has gradually become distinctive and entity; one of the most significant developments at Grand Seiko was the decision last year, to make Grand Seiko its own brand, instead of a sub-brand under the larger Seiko banner. The disappearance of the Seiko logo from the dials of Grand Seiko watches did away with what had always been a bit of redundancy and although the gesture was largely symbolic, it does say something about how the replica Grand Seiko sees itself evolving in the years to come.
Grand Seiko has not been a brand whose good name was driven by limited editions; on the contrary, the natural scarcity of Grand Seiko in the USA lent Grand Seiko cheap replica watches an organic exclusivity. While, Grand Seiko limited editions have started to appear in recent years, with unusual dials and in some instances, in valuable metals – and at price points – which are something of a novelty for Grand Seiko in the U.S. market.
The 44GS-style cases will be provided in steel, 18k rose gold, and platinum, and each will feature a variation on a new dial design. The dials have a very intricate pattern which, like the fan-favorite Snowflake dial, are not a literal illustration of anything, but are instead a kind of abstraction of organic forms that can evoke many different things.
The dial was encouraged by one created for this amazing model, which was a Hi-Beat model that from what I’ve been able to find, was in the Grand Seiko catalogue only in 1970 and which featured, in addition to this unusual dial, a very nice hammer-textured gold case.
The steel model has the a unique eye-catching dial of the three – the dials for all three models are very absorbing visually, but the steel model has a light blue finish with a particular gemlike quality, shifting in color and saturation relying on the direction and intensity of the light.
Pricing, production numbers, and release date are all TBD for the moment, but I’d hope these to release sometime this fall; it seems reasonable to guess that prices will more or less approximate those of the Baselworld Hi-Beat limited editions, in platinum, gold, and steel. The quality remains as inexplicably high for the price asked as ever, and for the moment, they remain a bit of an insider’s fake watch – if not exactly a well-kept cult secret, then at least a token of discernment, and an open-minded willingness to see quality for what it is.

Contrast of Replica Rolex’s Oystersteel and Traditional Stainless Steel

As Rolex never stopped the process of refining and improving their watches, some of the areas in which we have seen the vast advancements are the new materials that are being made for use in their replica watches. 
From scratch-proof ceramic bezels to ferromagnetic alloy movement components, contemporary Rolex fake watches utilize some of the most advanced materials on this planet to aid in the company’s ongoing pursuit of building the best mechanical wristwatches possible. However, in spite of all of the unique, proprietary machines and materials that get used at the Rolex factory in Geneva, one of the most interesting factors of the Rolex production process is the type of stainless steel that is used for the cases and bracelets of their watches.
Most timepiece manufacturers use 316L stainless steel, which is more than adequate for the vast majority of applications and environments one is likely to encounter in everyday life. However, Rolex chooses to use a unique blend of 904L stainless steel for their watches, known as “Oystersteel” that is resistant to a number of different forms of corrosion. However, no distinction was made between the two metals, so it is highly likely that “Oystersteel” is just Rolex’s name for the high-quality, 904L stainless steel that is produced by their in-house foundry.
904L stainless steel is a low-carbon variety of stainless steel with additives of nickel, chromium, copper, and molybdenum to make it highly resistant to the vast majority of different types of corrosion. Most commonly used in the aerospace and chemical industries, 904L is difficult to shape and often requires the use of specialized equipment to properly cut and machine. Even though it is more expensive and difficult to use, 904L can take on a higher polish than traditional stainless steel alloys and possess a number of anti-corrosive properties that are somewhat similar to those of precious metals.
When they became the first wristwatch manufacturer to use it on a large scale in their timepieces, Rolex’s use of 904L stainless steel dates all the way back to 1985. Initially, during the late 1980s, 904L stainless steel was only used for the replica Rolex Sea-Dweller line of deep-sea diving watches; however in 2003, the  Rolex replica switched all of their lines of watches over to 904L stainless steel, thanks to the superior corrosion resistance that it offered.
Rolex found that stainless steel watches exhibited more premature wear on their case-back threads than what was observed on their precious metal counterparts, and so the decision was made to switch to 904L stainless steel for all of their lines of watches.
Even though the “Oystersteel” is likely just another name for the 904L stainless steel manufactured by Rolex’s in-house foundry, it is undeniable that 904L stainless steel gives additional benefits over most traditionally used stainless steel varieties. Whether it is called “Oystersteel” or 904L stainless steel, this highly durable, corrosion-resistant metal is part of what defines a contemporary replica Rolex.